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Month: May 2006

See? Turtles!

See? Turtles!

We figured Memorial Day would be our only chance to get out to the beach and see some turtles, but we already had a full schedule (sleeping in until 8:00–which proved to be much more difficult than we originally anticipated), having a conference call with the Heiselt side of the family, and plastering the North Shore with posters for our 5K. And there were small distractions as well, such as getting Liz a new hat (she’s not very good at remembering to put on sunscreen every time she goes outside–and cancer is not on the list of skin conditions she wants to add to her collection), and waiting in line for a shave ice at Matsumoto’s. But as we were driving home to get ready for our run, we noticed a lot of people crowding around something on a beach. Sure enough–sea turtle! There were a few swimming around in the water (which is how we were hoping to see them), but we weren’t in our suits and we just had a minute anyway. But we got pictures, and that’s what really matters. Next time you better believe we’ll be riding around on their backs through the currents.

This is how we feel.

This is how we feel.

I wrote this in a moment of passion. Perhaps I should have let it sit a little bit longer before posting, but I’ve done that a few times before–kept these feelings tucked away and promised myself that if it ever happened again I would do what I have thought so many times of doing, but hadn’t done yet. This may not be the best way to go about this, but I am tired of people writing off my homesickness with the phrase, “But you’re in Hawaii,” as if we had entered a magical realm where everyone is happy and the spirit of aloha is so rampant that you would think that perhaps we had somehow become a part of the City of Enoch. Newsflash: we’re still in the telestial kingdom.

We live halfway across the ocean, and good portions of the way across a continent from most of our friends and all of our family. We are an odd case in our neighborhood, and even in our town, because we are not students, but we look like we could be. We inhabit a precarious position here and nobody seems to know how to act around us, and we often feel ignored. We are also some of the few people we know on this island who don’t have any sort of family to have dinner with on Sunday nights, or to hangout with on lazy weekends. But we are busy people, too. We both work, we spend a lot of time on our fundraising for Team in Training and running to prepare for our marathon (which is only three weeks away), plus we have our church callings and responsibilities as well. And we try to keep in touch with our friends and families, to let them know that we love them and think about them often, with the hope that they will help us feel their love for us, too, because, and I’m not going to lie to you, sometimes living in Hawaii stinks. It is hard to be away from everybody we know and to know that there is nobody here that needs us as much as we need them. We want to be a part of everyone’s lives, but it is hard when we feel that no one cares if we are a part of their lives.

To those of you who do let us know that you are thinking of us, who try to keep in touch, and let us know that we are still as much a part of your lives as you are of ours, thanks. We really appreciate it. We love getting phone calls, comments on our blogs, and e-mails. They make our days.

Game On!

Game On!

We like to think we’re something special. Or, more accurately, that there is something special about our relationship. We thought maybe it has something to do with the fact that people confuse us as being siblings. But we don’t think that just because we both have brown hair and brown eyes we look like brother and sister. We were told recently that we have the same personality. Maybe that is it. But, then again, the person who told us that had met Micah approximately two minutes before. I do not think that her evaluation is entirely accurate. It has been suggested that it is because we are both fifth born in our families. I have nothing to refute such a suggestion.

However, we have another theory. We think it may have something to do with the fact that we are a pretty good Cranium team. Conan & Melissa gave us the game for Christmas, and since then we have pretty much wasted all of the other couples we have played. Of course, we have only played three other couples, but only one of them even made it to the second half of the board before we won. Our heads are getting a little bit big now and we are ready to be humbled. So, we would like to challenge all y’all to a game of Cranium next time we are under the same roof. We will play in teams (liz&micah vs. one other couple (a couple does not have to consist of married people–just two people)) and if we lose we will buy you ice cream. If we win, we get the satisfaction of knowing that we are the coolest.

Too Kinds

Too Kinds

Micah once told me that he thought it would be the coolest thing if random people came up to him and handed him money. Back in the day when I imagined that I could make all of his wildest dreams come true, I decided that I would arrange for this to happen. Unfortunately, he was never around when my messengers came to deliver the goods, and he thought it was kind of weird to be getting money wrapped in PowerPuff Girls wrapping paper every few hours. I would have been better off drawing a picture of a liger. Or perhaps a corse (that is a cow/horse).

But Micah is such a wonderful, bright, young, fresh looking young man that he really doesn’t need any help from me to get random people’s cash. It has happened twice in the past eight months. The first time was when we went down to Waikiki for the Sunset at the Beach where they showed the Season 2 Premiere of LOST a week before everybody else in the US got to see it. We sat by a nice older couple who lived in a condo nearby. Micah was kind enough to run and get them a survey and had a nice chat with them (I was busy trying to keep my glasses dry . . .). While he was off submitting their surveys they slipped me a $10 and told me they were giving it to me because they knew that I would accept it on behalf of my husband and that I was to take him out to lunch sometime with it. I’m not sure what that was supposed to mean (the part about them knowing I would accept it), but I found myself unable to refuse. We had a delicious deli sandwich and some frozen lemon custard that was pretty much to die for.

Then, last Friday we went to the temple for our bi-weekly visit. It was a small session and we were, as usual, the witness couple. Back in the changing room after the session, a nice lady asked me how long we had been married, if we were students, and if we had any kids. I think all of my answers surprised her. But that didn’t stop her from confronting us as we were about to head out the door and giving Micah a $10 to go out for ice cream with. Our protests were in vain. I mean really, how do you argue with such things, especially in the temple. Sadly, we were unable to go out for ice cream that night, or the next night either. Then for FHE we decided to walk down to 7-11 and get a slurpee. We noticed a freezer full of Ben & Jerry’s next to the slurpee dispenser and the Neopolitan Dynamite practically jumped out in front of us. Since there isn’t a Cold Stone within 45 minutes, we decided this was the next best option.

You’d better believe I’m glad I married somebody so wonderful that people just can’t help but want to treat him to something delicious.

The Man Has Skills

The Man Has Skills

I just have to brag about my husband’s mad design skills a bit. Last weekend was the 14th Annual World Fireknife Championships, hosted by the Polynesian Cultural Center. As the resident designer, Micah had the responsibility of designing the t-shirts. He and Ray came up with a plan to do a hip-and-trendy shirt that would get them out of the ring-of-fire-on-black-shirt rut that they have been in for a while now. Micah came up with this slightly more abstract design, which was promptly rejected by the head of retail, who just couldn’t see it and didn’t think it would sell. Unfortunately, there wasn’t enough time for Micah to design something else. Shucks! So they had to go with his original design.

He got a call when we were at the yard sale informing him that the shirts were figuratively flying off the shelves, and that they would almost surely be sold out before the end of the competition. Moral of the story: Micah is awesome. But I’ve always known that.

Yard Sale-ing

Yard Sale-ing

We know. It’s been a whole week since we last posted! And since we know you’ve all been holding your breath to find out what has been going on in the lives of Liz & Micah that would keep them from posting something on their blog for a whole week. You can breathe now. I’m going to tell you. Some of you may recall that we are fundraising for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. This weekend we had our first big fundraiser–a yard sale. We posted signs all over Laie and Hauula asking people to donate stuff. And we sure did get lots of it. As you can see by the pictures, our apartment was suffed with stuff. It was driving us more than a little crazy. But on Thursday we finally got it all out of our apartment and down to Kailua, where we were having the sale, at the home of the LLS Team in Training Director. We took some stuff down last week, made a trip with a van on Thursday, and another trip Friday night. In total, we had 3 VW Passat-fulls (you’d be surprised at how much a Passat can hold) and a a minivan minus benches full.

We started the sale at 6:30 Saturday morning and had people coming by at 6:00 to try to get the “good” stuff. We did a steady business all morning, but by the afternoon it had all dried up. The last few people to come didn’t even get out of their cars. They just stopped and asked, “Do you have any fish tanks? Cookie jars? Whatever?” And we were saddened to have to tell them no.

All in all it was fairly successful. We sold probably about two Passat-fulls of stuff, and the rest will probably go to Goodwill. While it wasn’t the super-duper success we had secretly dreamed of, we did as well as we could reasonably have hoped for. And we are a few hundred dollars closer to our fundraising goal. More importantly, though, we can now move freely around our apartment. Hooray.

unFried Green Tomatoes

unFried Green Tomatoes

Many of you know that we have been waiting with bated breath for our tomato to begin producing fruit. We have been enjoying the basil and cilantro for some time now, and have even plucked off a few leaves of lettuce for a sandwich. But even though our tomato plant had practically turned in to a tree and sprouted many beautiful yellow flowers, we were not seeing any of those promising green globes. We were so sad. Sad like a raincloud.

Until Friday, that is. There are five. And don’t ask why we didn’t see that one on the right. It must be at least a week old. Just know that we are so happy that they have arrived safely.

No More Breadlines for Liz

No More Breadlines for Liz

Don’t you love it when you walk into a job interview thinking, “Why am I here? I don’t want this job.” And then you walk out of the interview, not only employed, but actually excited about what you will be doing? I love it, too.

I must admit that when I got the message on my phone that the BYU-H Financial Aid office wanted to interview me about the part-time temporary position of “Financial Aid Assistant,” I was less than ecstatic. I mean, generally speaking I get really excited about filing and data entry and all of those fun things I did when I was working at AlphaGraphics in high school, but I just wasn’t feeling it this time around. I am a college grad. I have a degree. I just had a super-ultra important job in the state legislature. And now they want me to put papers in files? Give me a break. But then again, I was desperate for a job and beggers can’t be chosers. Or so I am told.

However, I had a change of heart as I was interviewing with Mr. Duke. It turns out that, yes, I will be spending three hours a day doing “documentation” in Excel (which I currently don’t know much about, but I’m sure it will come in handy), but I will be spending three more hours helping the webmasters create content for a new financial aid/scholarship website. Which I think might be kind of interesting and useful, and possibly a good thing for someone interested in copywriting and editing. So, for the next four to six months, I get to work in the same building as Micah. We can go into work together and have lunch together and send secrect coded messages through the air vents together. Oh, ya, and work, too. It’ll be awesome. But, since I only work six hours a day and Micah has to work eight, that leaves two hours for me to lay out on Bikini Beach while I wait for Micah to get off work.

Life’s rough. But at least I’m employed.

Parlez-vous anglais?

Parlez-vous anglais?

Since we have moved here we have had more than one experience with being entirely clueless about what is being said to us. Our first week here we went to the temple. It was my second time through. And it was in Samoan. We would have enjoyed it a bit more, I believe, if our headsets had not been a little bit wishy-washy about when they worked and when they didn’t.

We have also had trouble here and there with understanding what in the world the sacrament meeting speakers are saying. I have to admit that the first month or so of going to church in a Polynesian ward was a somewhat discouraging. Not only did hardly anybody talk to us, when people did talk to us, we were hard-pressed to know if they were speaking our language. By now we are a little more used to the pidgin and only have to strain our ears a little to pick up the message. Don’t think we’ll ever be any good at speaking it. Although, truth be told, when you get Micah around his Polynesian buddies he adopts the tone of pidgin, if not the actual words. I was really excited a few months ago when one of Micah’s friends asked me, “Eh, where da kine go?” and I knew he wanted to know where Micah went.

Then, last week Micah’s intern got married and we were invited. The groom was Malaysian, the bride Taiwanese. They were married by a Samoan in a temple in the United States. We were two of the five white people in the room. Of course, this is nothing unusual for Hawaii. There are probably as many or more intercultural marriages here than there are intracultural, at least at BYU-H. The ceremony itself was in English, but the reception was a different story. The emcees were another Malaysian/Taiwanese couple, and although they tried to keep things evenly split between Mandarin and English, it sure felt like most of the time we sat staring blankly at each other while all of the Taiwanese people laughed and cheered.

Can’t wait until we all speak the language of the Lord.